402124 A comparison of political systems: The U.S. and Europe: complements and contrasts

summer semester 2011 | Last update: 17.02.2011 Place course on memo list
402124
A comparison of political systems: The U.S. and Europe: complements and contrasts
SE 2
5
not applicable
not applicable
English
The capitalist organization of production and the cultural heritage of the US resemble that of Western Europe. Both are advanced democratic capitalist societies. Both enjoy high per capita GDPs, high levels of labor productivity, high ratios of capital to labor, similar occupational structures with growing service sectors, highly skilled labor forces, and democratic and stable political systems, Yet, when it comes to politics Europe differs markedly from the U.S. Political cleavages, institutional structures, party systems, ideologies, and policies are all very different in Europe than in the U.S. Analyses of these differences are of interest to us not only because they help us understand our own societies better, but they also help us raise and answer broader theoretical issues with regards to the nature and future of advanced democratic capitalist societies. For example, is American politics in some sense underdeveloped in comparison to Europe? That is, does Western Europe represent the future for the U.S.? Or is the opposite the case? Does the U.S. represent the vanguard that Western Europe will come to emulate? Or to put it another way: Whose side is history on? Of course, this way of posing the question presumes that there is a European model of politics—something that Europeans would find objectionable. They would point to the same profound political differences that exist among the countries of Europe as those that distinguish the U.S. from them. European countries differ among themselves when it comes to institutions, party systems, ideologies, and policies. Still, the comparison between the U.S. and Europe can be enlightening, if we acknowledge the broad, general, abstract level at which we are working. Both the U.S. and Europe are curious what the mirror sees when it looks back at them.
Analytical Questions (as required, every other week) 20% Research Proposal 20% Research Paper 20% Class Participation 20% Final Exam 20 % Students must achieve at least 75 points to pass the course. Students who receive less than 75 points are subject to receive a 5 for the course.
Andrew Markovits, Uncouth Nation Steven Hill, Europe’s Promise Sergio Fabbrini, America and Its Critics
not applicable
Group 0
Date Time Location
Mon 2011-03-07
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-03-14
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-03-21
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-03-28
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-04-04
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-04-11
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-05-02
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-05-09
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-05-16
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-05-23
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-05-30
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-06-06
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-06-20
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free
Mon 2011-06-27
10.00 - 11.45 SR VII (Theologie) SR VII (Theologie) Barrier-free