641201 Literature and Intermediality I: Myth theories exemplified by Homer¿s »Odyssey« and its cinematic development.

summer semester 2014 | Last update: 15.05.2014 Place course on memo list
641201
Literature and Intermediality I: Myth theories exemplified by Homer¿s »Odyssey« and its cinematic development.
UE 2
5
every 2 weeks
annually
German

This course has three objectives: In a first step, the students will become familiar with basic texts of modern myth-theory. The focus is primarily on the theoretical approaches and considerations of Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno, Roland Barthes, René Girard and Jan Assmann. In a second step, the practical applicability of these approaches will be verified using the example of the "Odyssey". And finally cinematic translations and adaptations of the Odysseus-myth will be examined in a third step. Special consideration is given on "intermedial transpositions" and "transmedia analogies" (Werner Wolf) such as those in Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968), Jim Jarmusch's "Broken Flowers" (2005) and Joel and Ethan Coen's "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" (2000).

The multifarious and complex world of ancient myths is in modern times often conveyed through the medium of film. But what changes and renovations learn ancient myths, such as that of Odysseus, in the cinematic context of the 20th and 21 Century? And how can we work with certain theoretical positions beyond the border of the written medium literature (eg, in film)? As part of the course these issues will be addressed by analysis of Homer's epic and various cinematic adaptations of the Odysseus-myth. In addition to the films already mentioned, "classical" literary adaptations are also taken into account, such as the monumental version of "Ulisse" (1954, directed by Mario Camerini), and also films that deal on a metadiscursive level with the ancient material such as Jean-Luc Godard's " Le Mépris"(1963) will be analyzed.

The theoretical positions will be presented by the lecturer. The films and their references to the myth of Odysseus will be elaborated in presentations and discussions by the students.

To complete the course the students have to take part in learning groups and prepare keynote speeches during the semester. At the end of the semester a short paper (circumference about 3-5 pages) has to be written. In addition, the active participation in the discussions will be part of the rating.

1.    Harth, Dietrich / Assmann, Jan: Revolution und Mythos. Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer 1992.

2.    Barner, Wilfried u.a. (Hg.): Texte zur modernen Mythentheorie. Stuttgart: Reclam 2007.

3.    Girard, René (Hg.): Die verkannte Stimme des Realen. Eine Theorie archaischer und moderner Mythen. München u.a.: Carl Hanser 2005. (Edition Akzente Hanser)

4.    Horkheimer, Max / Adorno, Theodor W.: Dialektik der Aufklärung. Frankfurt a. M.: Fischer 172008.

5.    Zimmermann, Bernhard: Mythos Odysseus. Texte von Homer bis Günter Kunert. Leipzig: Reclam, 2004.

not applicable
04.03.2014
Group 0
Date Time Location
Tue 2014-03-04
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-03-18
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-04-01
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-04-29
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-05-13
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-05-27
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free
Tue 2014-06-10
10.15 - 13.30 40123 40123 Barrier-free