622013 VO Global History: Red Globalization? Socialisms in the Twentieth Century

summer semester 2020 | Last update: 12.06.2020 Place course on memo list
622013
VO Global History: Red Globalization? Socialisms in the Twentieth Century
VO 2
5
weekly
each semester
English

Overview of socialism as one of the formative social forms of the 20th century and related current academic debates; understanding the possibilities and limits of selected global historical approaches, including entanglements and transfers, actor-centred approaches and global biographies.

The understanding of globalization as an exclusively Western or capitalist process has recently been challenged: rather there was (and still is) a whole range of globalizations, or at least globalization projects. The alternative project with the greatest reach was socialism: in the second half of the 20th century, more than half the world's population lived – at least temporarily – in socialist states. Contrary to Karl Marx' assumption, however, socialism had not prevailed in the capitalist center but in the periphery: first in Russia and following the Second World War also in the countries of Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. This geographical expansion was accompanied by a diversification of socialist concepts and practices. The lectures discusses the subsequent circulation of ideas, resources and people in the "socialist world system" and the 
dynamics of transfers, alliances and rivalries with examples from Albania to Zanzibar.

Lecture

Written examination in the penultimate working session 

Becker, Joachim, and Rudy Weissenbacher, eds. Sozialismen: Entwicklungsmodelle von Lenin bis Nyerere. Wien: Promedia, 2009.
Burton, Eric. “Socialisms in Development: Revolution, Divergence and Crisis, 1917–1991.” Journal für Entwicklungspolitik 33, no. 3 (2017): 4–20.
Middell, Matthias, ed. Kommunismus jenseits des Eurozentrismus. Berlin: Metropol, 2019.
Pons, Silvio, and Stephen A. Smith, eds. The Cambridge history of communism: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.

This course is also considered Extra-European History I or II for students of the curriculum BA History (2009). In this case, a reduced workload applies.

Online-enrollment required, starting on Feb. 1, 2020!

not applicable

The lecture is held in English, discussions, presentations and final papers can be held/written in German as well. 

02.03.2020
Group 0
Date Time Location
Mon 2020-03-02
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-03-09
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-03-16
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-03-23
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-03-30
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-04-20
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-04-27
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-05-04
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-05-11
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-05-18
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-05-25
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-06-08
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-06-15
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free
Mon 2020-06-22
10.15 - 11.45 Hörsaal 6 Hörsaal 6 Barrier-free